If you can’t beat them, join them – reaching your MVP in Social Media

If you can’t beat them, join them – reaching your MVP in Social Media

I hear a lot from senior managers of a certain age that Social Media isn’t for them. They feel that they should participate but Social Media seems to be an alien world, for the under 25s only.

So here’s my advice on how you adopt some of the practices of Growth Hacking and the Social Media world to build your own presence and take advantage of Social Media tools.

Why MVP ?

Growth hacking is the new approach to development. It’s all about fearlessly getting to market and growing as quickly as you can using whatever methods you can (some not so legal!).  Fail fast, then fail better..

The idea of an Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is that you get to market with just enough so that you can launch, and establish the market opportunity.  If you are successful, you then develop as you go to meet market demand.

You can use the same approach to Social Media.  You don’t need to invest lots of money to build a presence. You can get started very cheaply and easily, and build from there. Provided you follow some key principles.

Don’t underestimate the power of Social Media

Whatever your views on Social Media, no one can deny that it has incredible power. Take, for example, the Champions League Match between Dortmund and Monaco. The match had to be rescheduled due to a bomb attack on the Dortmund bus, and there were thousands of Monaco fans needing accommodation in Dortmund.

German fans turned to Twitter to offer accommodation to Monaco fans.  What was amazing was not just that Monaco fans could find accommodation but the goodwill generated by the many shares on Social Media of Dortmund and Monaco fans together.

Don’t over-estimate Social Media

But, there’s also a lot of hype about Social Media…   Not everyone uses Social Media. And the world of Social Media – like much in the Digital World – is highly fragmented.

Im alot cooler on the internet
This T shirt says it all !

Even in the UK, where we have a relatively high level of literacy (above the European average according to Digital Economy and Society Index DESI 2017 )  there are 5.3 million people who have never used the internet. (Office of National Statistics)

There is also a dark side to the internet. Millions of accounts on the leading platforms are actually fake accounts – and nearly 77% of all internet activity in Europe is “dark social”;  untracked and off the radar. (eConsultancy, Feb 2016)

In the UK, there are 5.3 million people who have never used the internet. (Office of National Statistics)

The Key point is that it is highly unlikely that 100% of your customers and prospects will use Social Media. And it is extremely unlikely that they will use Social exclusively as a channel to find out about your company or your products.

Social Media is a channel not a strategy

So you have to include Social Media in your strategy, but don’t make Social Media the strategy. Social Media platforms provide great communication channels to your target audiences.

But remember that Social Media platforms are highly fragmented and tribalised. So my advice is:

  • Link your messages on Social Media to all of your other channels. Don’t treat each channel (and this applies as well to email newsletters, campaigns, website, PR) as a silo. Link everything together. This will probably save you work too !
  • Consistent messaging – have consistent messages which you deliver across all of your channels.
  • Adapt for different audiences: different audiences have different expectations on the various Social Media channels (and this also applies to email, web sites and so on). For instance, platforms like Snapchat and Instagram tend to be highly image orientated. LinkedIN tends to be more thoughtful and business-like.

However beware of generalisations… because…

Rules – what rules ?

You see a lot of articles setting out rules for how to maximise use of platforms like LinkedIN, Facebook, Snapchat, Twitter etc.

However in reality there are no hard and fast rules. Twitter didn’t even invent the Hashtag:  end-users created this. But this is exactly how these platforms develop and innovate…

rules what rules

Social Media is still relatively new. Most of the major platforms are under 10 years old and there is a lot of change going on in this sector.Facebook owns WhatsApp

  • Facebook introducing new Business features
  • Facebook owns Instagram and is introducing new features to counter the rise of Snapchat
  • Microsoft owns LinkedIN
  • Twitter may charge for Premium membership

Content – quality not quantity

According to Marketing Week, nearly 60% of all corporate content is clutter.  To be fair this doesn’t just apply to Digital content (how many people actually read brochures ?) however Social Media makes it deceptively easy to create and distribute content, without any of the usual balances and controls you would normally apply to a printed piece, or content for your website.

Unintegrated marcomms

People say that the average life of a Tweet is 18 minutes – so, if you add it all up, the vast majority of digital content has no impact, and is quite possibly never read.

So, my advice is as follows,..

  • Quality not quantity – If it isn’t worth saying then don’t say it !!  (Be honest, who actually reads #Mondaymotivation tweets ?)
  • Be consistent – each Social network is a Communications channel… have a clearly defined objective for your messages and adapt them for each channel.
  • Cut and paste blogs for each separate channel

Play the game – when you get to your MVP you can be selective over who follows you

If you are going to participate then you need a Minimum Viable Presence – this means a credible number of followers.

  • So, for LinkedIN, this means at least 200 followers, preferable over 1000 to become an All-star Profile.
  • For Twitter and Facebook, at least 500 followers

There are a number of simple techniques to do this. Contact me to find out more.

This means that you will have to accept a lot of poor quality followers … people who have no business value… but I would say that you can be fussy about your followers once you’ve got to your MVP…

So, my advice is that, to get the best out of Social Media you need to put it in its place.  It’s a valuable communications channel, which can really add value and reach new people in new ways.

Just don’t put too much effort into using Social Media.  No more, no less.

I’m a Freelance Marketing Consultant. Contact me to find out how I can help your transform your business for the digital world.

Advertisements

Growth Hacking for Corporates – Too Young to Rock n Roll, Too Old to Die

Growth Hacking for Corporates – Too Young to Rock n Roll, Too Old to Die

Grow fast or die slow (Samir Patel) is the mantra of Growth Hacking. But, for corporate long timers like me, Jethro Tull’s Too old to Rock ‘n Roll, Too Young to Die sums things up more accurately.   We feel that we are missing out on something exciting but we are not entirely sure what we are missing out on.

Not any more.  Recently I went to an excellent seminar on Growth hacking by Vincent Dignan . (If you get the chance – go and see him!).  I found it very inspiring and also full of great tips and advice to growth traffic and users and build your social media presence rapidly.

But what really stuck me was that, although, Growth Hacking is seen as mainly for startups there is a lot that Corporate marketing teams can learn.

So here’s my advice on Corporates could deploy these techniques..

It starts with the strategy

It was great to see that, even in the fast moving and murky world of growth-hacking,  some universal truths apply.   Namely that if you don’t have a clear strategy of who you are targeting, with what products and offerings, and know which channels to use … then you are likely to fail.  Likewise if your products or services don’t deliver what your target customers want, then you are not going to be successful.

Or as Vincent put it in millenial-speak: “you need to know who your target is, where they hang out and what problems they have.”

Yet how often do organisations start with the tactics and then try to retro-fit a strategy ?

Plan to succeed but learn from your mistakes

One of the great things about the Growth Hacking movement is speed to market, and risk taking.  In my earlier career I have been involved in guerilla marketing projects (we didn’t call it “growth hacking” back then) – these are great fun.

However for someone trained in the traditional CIM values of Segment / Target / Positioning it was reassuring to have so much emphasis in the seminar on planning.  This came through in a number of ways..

  • Plan your approach to your target audience
  • Plan your onboarding strategy
  • Plan how you will grow your traffic, through identifying which channels to use

I think the key thing here for Corporates is that you can manage the risk of trying new techniques and approaches, provided you have clear objectives of what you are trying to achieve.  You have to be bold enough not just to try new things but also – the difficult bit – to admit to failures.  I’ve certainly found in my career that I’ve learned a lot through mistakes..   As the old saying goes “nothing ventured, nothing gained”

And, when you find something that works – keep doing it:  rinse and repeat !

Digital isn’t the only way to reach your audience

Digital may be what captures the attention of Corporate Marketers, but it’s not the only way to reach your audience. Remember that you need to get your messages to your target audience “where they hang out” – which may well mean offline.

So it’s no surprise that the leading digital brands are using more and more traditional – ie offline – media. In 2016  TV advertising revenue hit record levels of £5.27bn in 2015 as digital brands including Facebook, Google and Netflix become the second biggest investors in the medium.[Marketing Week]

facebook-outdoor-campaign
Facebook launched a big campaign to promote Live Video in October 2016 using Tradtional Media

Or a well crafted Direct Mail piece is a proven way to get attention and drive people on line.

Keep it simple: it’s the invisible things that will make a difference

OK you may have a fabulous website but how easy is it for your target audience to do the bread-and-butter things?

The key thing for me was that it’s not just about the website / app etc. The back-end processes – the ones that aren’t visible –  that are just as important.

For instance, how easy is it find where to sign up,  what happens when someone signs up – do they get a thank-you email ?  Have you thought through the whole process of onboarding ?

I’m constantly surprised at how simple (and dare I say it obvious) things really make a difference… Like moving a paper-based system to an online one. Or using simple Marketing Automation to ensure that every new user or interaction gets a thank you.

Content: Weddings and Babies

It goes without saying that content is a key component of any Marketing activity. However in the crowded, fragmented world of the internet, it’s even more important to make your content stand out. As Vincent Dignan said, you need to make your content as interesting as Weddings or Babies.

Although the typical Corporate launching your  new Widget 3000 isn’t trying to outcompete weddings and babies, the content still needs to be relevant, interesting and – ideally, depending on what you are selling – compelling.

Yet, according to the Havas’ latest Meaningful Brands survey, “60% of the content created by the world’s leading 1,500 brands is ‘just clutter’ that has little impact on consumers’ lives or business results”. [Marketing Week].

So here are some techniques for improving content…

Personalise your messages to your target segments. Again this may seem obvious but how often do you see Press Releases sent out as-is ?  In my view Press Releases are formal documents, intended  for Journalists and can very dull…   If you’ve done your homework, you’ve identified your target market and their wants and needs. Use this information to point out to your audience WHY the content of the Press Release is relevant to them..

Call to action.  Think what you want people to do when they read your content. When I was working in Marketing Communications in IBM we used to call it the “So What?” Test. In particular choose buttons for your website which actively encourage your users to take action…

@Vincentdignan
@Vincentdignan

And no, “Sign up for our Newsletter” does not appear !

And, last but not, least ..

“Don’t sweat the small things on day ONE”.  In other words, it’s better to get your content out, than worry too much about presentation and design.

Innovate but don’t go over to the Dark Side

It’s not for nothing that it’s called Growth Hacking as some of the techniques that are used by Growth Hackers are, frankly, of questionable legality !  Scraping a competitor’s site to extract key information or gathering emails  is probably a big no no for Corporates with a reputation to uphold.

However there’s nothing wrong with seeking out great models (including your competitors), and copying the best bits. Rather than reverse engineering growth (as the Growth Hackers say) or simply copying, I would find ways of improving on what your competitors are doing.

Which brings me on to my final point.

Growth Hacking is a state of mind

For me, Growth Hacking isn’t about techniques or strategies: it’s really a state of mind.

Vincent Dignan said in his seminar that, to be a good Growth Hacker, you need to be a “be a mixture of Mad Men and Math-Men”. What I took this to mean is a combination of the risk taking, can-do attitude of Mad Mean, with the level-headedness and focus of a strategic planner.

That’s why, for me, Growth Hacking and Social Media don’t have to be the Wild West anymore, even for Corporates.

Gone are the days of Social Not-working….  bring on the days of Sustainable Growth Hacking !

I’m a Freelance Marketing Consultant. Contact me to find out how I can help your transform your business for the digital world.